42nd Street Cinema



Film Diary #4 - Monday 21/11/2022 - Sunday 27/11/2022

Fourth edition of the Film Diary; covering films I've watched within the span of a week, accompanied with a short review and rating. I will try to churn these out as quickly as possible, but there's never enough hours in the day. These reviews won't appear under the index of reviews as I prefer to keep that reserved for more lengthier entries.

Films watched between Monday 21/11/2022 and Sunday 27/11/2022.

Monday 21/11/2022
Haute Tension / High Tension / Switchblade Romance (2003)
Haute Tension (2003)
Director: Alexandre Aja

I've long believed this to be Aja's best work, followed by P2 (2007) and then the updating of The Hills Have Eyes (2006). I can distinctly remember becoming obsessed with this film as a teenager, so I suppose I'm bringing a lot of personal bias to my rating. The plot sees two best friends, Marie and Alex, planning to spend a weekend with Alex's parents at their country, however events take a grisly turn when a boiler suit-clad maniac shows up on the night they arrive, and begins to systematically murder Alex's family. Overflowing with the red stuff, Haute Tension offers copious amounts of bloody bodily destruction and a veneer of psychological horror. Philippe Nahon brings an unstoppable and menacing energy to his role, and the sound design is unforgettable. A key ingredient in the New French Extremity. Check it out.



Monday 21/11/2022
Sissy (2022)
Sissy (2022)
Director: Kane Senes, Hannah Barlow

Sat down to check this one out with Emily; we checked out the trailer, gave it a shot, and ended up having a real good time with it. Two girls who were best friends as teenagers, Cecelia (don't call her Sissy!) and Emma, have a chance meeting after a decade, an encounter that results in Emma inviting Cecelia to her bachelorette weekend in a remote, but luxurious cabin in the woods. Silly, bloody, oddly endearing and surprisingly dark; this is certainly one of the better Shudder originals. Nicely paced and not too predictable, give Sissy a chance.



Tuesday 22/11/2022
Knock Knock (2015)
Knock Knock (2015)
Director: Eli Roth

I'd been waiting to see this for sometime and unfortunately I found it to be a relatively dull affair, and a really poor effort from Eli Roth, who's last semblances of creativity seem to have thoroughly dried up. Knock Knock is effectively a remake of a remake; for those unaware, this is based on the gripping psychosexual thriller Death Game (1977), which in turn was heavily influenced by the earlier Little Miss Innocence (1973). Performances are decent; perhaps it's just me, but this seemed like a really strange role for Keanu Reeves, he plays it very well, albeit for a hammy screaming during the in the closing moments. Lorenza Izzo (who's married to Eli) and Ana de Armas (who's not married to Eli) are entertaining, spunky, and convincingly cracked as the deux femme fatales terrorising poor Keanu.



Tuesday 22/11/2022
Night of the Creeps (1986)
Night of the Creeps (1986)
Director: Fred Dekker

Another favourite from my teenage years. The film offers further evidence that Tom Atkins is a blessing for genre film. I watched this one alongside Emily who at first was a little thrown off as the film opens aboard a spaceship, with dwarfish aliens scampering around, firing laser rifles, before cutting to a black and white sequence. The fact character names are based on (mostly) horror filmmakers shouldn't be lost on any bonafide fan. I remember when I copped one of the first trailers for James Gunn's Slither (2006) and crying foul about the similarities; space slugs entering people's bodies and turning people into zombies. Essential; check it out.



Friday 25/11/2022
Slash/Back (2022)
Slash/Back (2022)
Director: Nyla Innuksuk

Odd little film I checked out via Shudder. I started watching this with Emily, who after about 35 minutes could no longer withstand the wooden acting from literally everyone on-screen. I watched the rest by myself a day later and she was right, there's some terribly wooden performances, but I enjoyed the Inuit take on genre film. It reminded me of the recent and excellent Canadian zombie horror, Blood Quantum (2019); a film that revolves around a First Nations reserve during a zombie outbreak, who's residents are immune to the plague because of their indigenous heritage. If you could imagine John Carpenter's The Thing (1982) set within an isolated Inuit community, and instead of testosterone-heavy Arctic researchers, they're bored adolescent girls, then you're on the right track. Not all bad, but not enough to shout about.



Saturday 26/11/2022
Centipede Horror (1982)
Centipede Horror (1982)
Director: Keith Li

Hong Kong lensed black magic shocker, infamous for featuring scenes of people vomiting live centipedes. The film manages to tap into a primal and hereditary fear of creepy crawlies. There's something so utterly grotesque and repulsive about centipedes that the sight of them alone is enough to make your stomach flip and your skin crawl. The worst part about this movie is its pacing, after a strong opening it feels like an eternity before there's any follow-up centipede action, and admittedly, it does get a little silly in the last act with a duel between two mages, but overall is a satisfyingly unpleasant flick. Check it out.



Sunday 27/11/2022
Crash (1996)
Crash (1996)
Director: David Cronenberg

Decided to watch this as it was my birthday and I was given carte blanche of choice by Emily. I opted for something relatively "normal", instead of choosing an edgy or provocative title like Passolini's Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975) or Shaun Costello's Water Power (1977), I settled on the somewhat controversial adaptation of J.G. Ballard's Crash. Hot off reading the novel, I thought it would be a great idea to tackle Cronenberg's screen adaptation. Strange. Strange may be the best word to describe how I feel about it. I felt like a few liberties had been taken with the source material, as if Cronenberg blindly assumes everyone has read the novel prior and is familiar with the story, because a few plot points are barely fleshed out, or are entirely glossed over. As it stands, I quite liked it; Emily loathed it and after a recent viewing of Videodrome (1983), she's subsequently banned all Cronenberg from our filmic choices. We'll see how long that lasts.

Film Diary #3 - Monday 07/11/2022 - Sunday 13/11/2022

Third entry for the Film Diary; covering films I've watched within the span of a week, accompanied with a short review and rating. I will try to churn these out as quickly as possible, evidently there's never enough hours in the day to watch, write, and then format this for the blog. These reviews won't appear under the index of reviews as I prefer to keep that reserved for more lengthier entries.

Films watched between Monday 07/11/2022 and Sunday 13/11/2022.

Monday 07/11/2022
The Birds II: Land's End (1994)
The Birds II: Land's End (1994)
Director: Rick Rosenthal credited as Alan Smithee

Attempting to make a sequel to a Hitchcock feature is always going to be unenviable or daring, but producing a made-for-TV sequel to a Hitchcock picture is almost unthinkable. To be completely honest, The Birds II: Land's End isn't an entirely terrible affair. It is when compared to its predecessor, but truthfully no worse than any more recent b movie schlock that you might find on the Sci-Fi Channel. It has some cool scenes, great explosions and cringeworthy, yet entertaining bird-attack sequences, but is hampered by abysmal pacing and vapid characters.



Tuesday 08/11/2022
A Haunted Turkish Bathhouse (1975)
A Haunted Turkish Bathhouse (1975)
Director: Kazuhiko Yamaguchi

Of all the films I watched this year, this is one of my favourites. Totally wild and bonkers with an indescribable plot that's sort of like a Kaibyō (supernatural/ghost cat) take on Edgar Allen Poe's The Black Cat. Beautifully shot; it's as colourful as an Argento flick, and thoroughly entertaining. It's not perfect, but if you dig zany movies with plenty of sleaze and feline absurdities, particularly those that originate from East Asia, do yourself a favour and check this one out.



Friday 11/11/2022
The Shiver of the Vampires / Le Frisson des Vampires (1971)
The Shiver of the Vampires / Le Frisson des Vampires (1971)
Director: Jean Rollin

Beautiful and dreamy in the way that Rollin's work often is, but I must confess that I didn't quite enjoy this much as I wanted to, nor as much as some of his other vampire themed work. It feels as though it's missing a crucial ingredient, only I can't discern what it is. It's full of the resplendent photography and lulling qualities you can expect from Rollin; I must revisit this again at a later date, and see if my opinion changes because I really wanted to love this. Also, the Acanthus soundtrack is outstanding; unique and memorable, a work unto itself.



Saturday 12/11/2022
Hostel (2005)
Hostel (2005)
Director: Eli Roth

The first of two Roth films in this weeks diary. I sat down to watch this with Emily at her request. Instrumental in spawning and canonising the term "torture porn", fathering two sequels, and inspiring many imitators, yet surprisingly Hostel isn't near as visceral as one would imagine. It still packs a wallop and Roth could have easily gone much further with the content in certain scenes. Filled to the brim with badly-aged lowbrow bro humour, reprehensible characters, and a commentary on the thrills, ills, and spills of sex tourism. I can distinctly remember when this came out, it was the same year as Rob Zombie's The Devil's Rejects (2005) and a younger gore-hungry me thoroughly enjoyed both.



Sunday 13/11/2022
Blue Ice (1985)
Blue Ice (1985)
Director: Phillip Marshak

Emily and I have started something that we like to call "Sex film Sunday", it's as self-explanatory as one could imagine. Not the first X film we've watched together; that would be Bob Chinn's comical Hot & Saucy Pizza Girls (1978). Blue Ice sees a Private investigator hired to locate and procure an ancient book, unbeknownst to him a group of escaped Nazis are also out to find the artefact, as it holds the power to turn any woman into a nymphomaniac. Nicely shot and edited; it features a Lynchian "blue light " sequence that appears during the finale that appears to take place outside of the films reality. I dug it; driven in equal measure by the plot and the sex scenes, its brisk 86 minute runtime moves along at a steady pace. Featuring minor roles from 42nd Street Cinema fave Jamie Gillis and a young, but recently disgraced, Ron Jeremy. If peepin' is your thing, peep this.



Sunday 13/11/2022
Cabin Fever (2002)
Cabin Fever (2002)
Director: Eli Roth

Following up our small foray into Roth-territory, Emily and I checked out his first feature film. It's a well-paced, slickly edited and stomach churning-ly gruesome effort about a highly contagious flesh eating disease and a group of obnoxious youths. Unfortunately some of the bro-humour and dialogue choices haven't aged too well; this is also evident in Hostel (2005), but don't be deterred, if for whatever reason you've never seen Cabin Fever check it out. There's plenty of wince-inducing scenes, brought on by queasy effects and character lines like:

Karen: Bert, what the hell is that?
Bert: Huh? Oh, I'm gonna go shoot some squirrels.
Paul: Why would you wanna kill squirrels?
Bert: 'cause they're gay.
Karen: Bert, don't be a fucking retard.
Bert: I'm kidding. I don't care if they're gay or straight, I'll kill 'em either way..

I remember being so confused when a remake was announced and actually came out in 2016, watch it if you like, but it doesn't get a glowing recommendation here, and the less said the better about the sequels, perhaps save for Ti West's Cabin Fever 2: Spring Fever (2009), I have a bit of a soft spot for that one.

Water Power (1977)

Water Power (1977)Since I talked about Forced Entry (1973), it's a no-brainer that I cover Shaun Costello's other outrageous 70s filth fest, the enema-centric XXX oddity, Water Power.

Inspired in part by Scorsese's immensely successful Taxi Driver (1976), and by real-life criminal Michael H. Kenyon who was nicknamed "The Illinois Enema Bandit". Kenyon would commit armed robberies against women, where they would be tied up with rope and given an enema. After being arrested, he pleaded guilty to six counts of armed robbery and was sentenced to six to twelve years in prison for each count, but was never charged for the enema assaults. Kenyon was paroled in 1981 after serving six years.

The film has quite an interesting production history, it was financed by Star Distributors; the porno outfit of the DeCavalcante crime family, the real-life inspiration for the DiMeo family from HBO hit, The Sopranos. Director Shaun Costello was reluctantly tasked by Sid Levine at Star to produce an "enema movie" for Robert DiBernardo, a Capo in the DeCavalcante family. An alleged attempt to make a quick buck off the back of the "Illnois Enema Bandit" story featured in a magazine. DiBernardo later caught up with Costello to back-peddle somewhat; claiming he didn't want to see it, know anything about it, or to have anyone know he was involved with it.

Costello's speedy production effort; rolls of 16mm, four days, and a total budget of $16,000 went down the drain. Water Power opened to "empty houses wherever it played". It was shelved after two years of distribution, until someone at Star got the idea to re-release the picture under a different directors name.
Attaining a huge degree of success with the likes of Deep Throat (1972) and The Devil in Miss Jones (1973), along with helping to usher in the era of "porn chic", Gerard Damiano's name was "acquired" through Gambino ties. DiBernardo made a request to the Columbo family to borrow it; this seems to be the start of the confusion as to why Gerard Damiano's name is attached to promotional materials and appears on certain prints of Water Power.

Re-released with 15 minutes of cutting room floor footage now reinserted to buff up the runtime, Water Power hit theatres again with an 86 minute version. The film ran unsuccessfully for another year before eventually being pulled and shelved. It was later released again this time in Europe and Japan through DiBernardo's connection to "The Walt Disney of Porn" - Ruben Sturman, where it incredibly reached some height of success.

In 1986, Robert DiBernardo was the target of a federal investigation for selling child pornography, and was shot in the back of the head by Gambino hitman Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano at the behest of John Gotti.

Starring the inimitable Jamie Gillis; and a supporting cast of some of the greatest names from the Golden Age of Porn; Eric Edwards is cast as a fellow kink-freak, decked out in a doctors garb who's eager to perform an enema on Jeanne Silver in a sex club. Water Power also marks the adult film debut of Jeanne, who in the same year would star in her own movie/quasi-documentary Long Jeanne Silver (1977), directed by porno progenitor Alex de Renzy. Marlene Willoughby portrays a faux-nurse who assists Edwards in his procedure. C.J. Laing is a tough female cop, unenviably tasked with baiting the bandit. Gloria Leonard and Sharon Mitchell both have minor roles as a hostess and prostitute (respectively) in the kink club, the Garden of Eden.



The plot is relatively simple, but worthy of discussion; Burt (Jamie Gillis) is a New Yorker with a proclivity for kink. No longer satisfied by his regular stroke books or whatever is on TV, he grabs his telescope to check-in on the object of his desire, and soon-to-be primary victim, his Air Stewardess neighbour (Clea Carson).
Burt descends from his squalid loft apartment to the seedy streets of NYC in search of a new kick. He visits a sex club; the Garden of Eden, there he's easily persuaded by the hostess (Gloria Leonard) and her low introductory offer: $10 for 15 minutes with Eve (Sharon Mitchell). Though visibly bored with Eve, Burt spurts and Eve leaves after his incessant questioning over the club's "specials". Burt returns to the hostess to further inquire about the "specials", quickly learning that they provide everything from B&D, S&M, infantilism, to showers; "both golden and brown", crossdressing, and high colonics. The latter being the one to pique Burt's interest. The following scene is pivotal, as we learn how far Costello and crew are willing to go and the character of Burt is forever changed by this experience. He's allowed to sit in on an enema being performed by The Doctor (Eric Edwards), aided by The Nurse (Marlene Willoughby) on a disobedient patient named Pamela (Jeanne Silver).

"Pamela is an uncommon girl, therefore I think she needs an uncommon enema." - The Doctor (Eric Edwards)

Edwards' intonation during this scene is marvellous and there's some really choice lines of dialogue with Edwards' character passionately divulging a grandiose history and explanation of the enema. He states hilarious and memorable phrases like "Bardex inflatable nozzle" and "cleanse the body of all vile humours" with such sincerity and so matter of factly it's impossible to suppress laughter.



Burt leaves the club in a dizzied state, irrevocably changed by experiencing the ultimate orgasm brought on by only witnessing the procedure. He arrives home with a changed outlook, aggressively shoving his older spank mags onto the floor, and some new "reading" material taking pride of place, a magazine dedicated to enemas; Water & Power, proclaiming "now we're talking, fuckin' enemas that's where it's at," He checks in on the object of his desire again, only to see her bonking her troglodyte fella (Leo Lovemore). Overpowered by his new-found pathology, Burt's opinion of his love interest is dramatically changed, deeming her to be dirty, but Burt knows how to make her clean again. He breaks into her apartment and rapes her at gunpoint, before forcibly administering her with an enema. Ordering her to get in the bathtub on her "fours like a dog", Gillis begins masturbating to completion over her buttocks as she starts to eject a chunky brown liquid. The effect is obviously faked as it doesn't come from her anus, but it still makes a messy spectacle.

This kind of crime doesn't go unnoticed and before long we're introduced to the cop who's put in charge of the case, Detectcive Jack Gallagher (John Buco). Incredibly he's pulled from the homicide squad by his captain (Philip Marlowe), specifically to catch the enema bandit. Gallagher is none too pleased and sees this as something of a demotion, so the captain partners him with Detective Irene Murray (C.J. Laing), who's taken a personal interest in the case.

In the next scene, Burt's apartment buzzer begins to blare, he rushes around attempting to find a suitable hiding place to stash the enema kit, finding the perfect place to be in the toilet, no less. Unbelievably we learn that Burt has a girlfriend, Barbara (Crystal Sync), with whom he has a short argument before screaming at her to get out of the apartment. This is a character detail that raises so many questions, given his mental stability and sexual "interests". Does she know about his stalking and predatory nature?, as there's black and white pictures of his neighbour plastered to his apartment walls.
From here on out, Burt packs a rucksack with a six shooter and an enema kit and embarks on a crusade against these "dirty bitches" with plans to "clean them out."



"What started as a simple act of vengeance has mushroomed into an addiction." - Burt (Jamie Gillis)

Like Forced Entry, the film is remarkably well put together; there are some skilfully framed shots, you can really see Costello put thought and effort into his work. It also features a sidesplittingly demented Taxi Driver-influenced diary voice-over by Gillis.

Burt is something of a corrupt and vengeful Travis Bickle of the colon; sans taxicab, avec enema kit. Costello playfully screws with the audience by juxtaposing a scene where sisters, Candy (Barbara Belkin) and Ginger (Susaye London) are dabbling in lesbian incest get caught in the act and brutalised by the bandit, with a consensual "love" scene between the two cops. The editing flicks back and forth between the two acts seemingly occurring at the same time, in different parts of the city, and I don't think including an act of anilingus was lost on anyone, nor is the fact that Gillis appears to be suffering from pink eye, something which can be seen clearly in the stalk sequence of the sisters.

During the film's climax there's a scene with C.J. Laing and Gillis that goes for broke, and proves why Jamie was one of the best performers in the biz. With C.J. gagged and restrained in a bathtub, Gillis administers an enema and begins to masturbate, as the water begins to jettison from Laing's puckered hole directly onto the head of Jamie's cock he ejaculates. A true professional.



I told a chap at work about this movie fairly recently and I don't think he immediately caught on that it was a hardcore flick. Anyhow, I later found out from a colleague that he had watched it, and he'd said to her that he didn't think it was going to be like "that". My other colleague told me she had made it clear to him "in future do not watch any of the films James suggests or talks about". I suppose it's fair advice for the less adventurous moviegoer.

You may be right calling me crazy (among other adjectives) for giving this 5 stars, but I fucking love this, and I've watched it more times than I like to admit. It's such an filmic oddity chock-full of absurdities, and despite the subject matter this doesn't come across anywhere as near as heavy as Forced Entry, since nobody is murdered, but the scenes of Gillis menacing women are still unpleasant, but isn't that the point? Performances across the board are great, and given the production, plot, and themes covered, the entire cast looks as though they're having a great time making one of the silliest and smuttiest films ever committed to celluloid. Water Power is proof they sure don't make 'em like this anymore.



For further reading, more information, and where I quoted Costello, click here.

Film Diary #2 - Monday 24/10/2022 - Sunday 30/10/2022

Second entry into the Film Diary; covering films I've watched within the span of a week, accompanied with a short review and rating. These reviews won't appear under the index of reviews as I prefer to keep that reserved for more lengthier entries.

Films watched between Monday 24/10/2022 and Sunday 30/10/2022.

Monday 24/10/2022
Fade To Black (1980)
Fade To Black (1980)
Director: Vernon Zimmerman

A love ode to not only classic horror cinema, but cinema itself. Lonely boy Eric Binford (wonderfully portrayed by Dennis Christopher) is a true cinephile; obsessed to the point of delusion with Marilyn Monroe and the Universal Monsters. An interesting character study; the film toys with conventional slasher tropes and sees Eric offing his "oppressors" guised as a multitude of monsters. It had been quite a while since I first saw this via a cruddy transfer on an illicit streaming site back in the mid to late 00s. It made an impression on me, perhaps on a personal level there were parts of Eric's character I could empathise with. This time, I found the film a bit slow; it plods along and is probably 15-20 minutes too long, but I still like it, and it also features an early minor role from a young Mickey Rourke!



Tuesday 25/10/2022
V/H/S/2 (2013)
V/H/S/2 (2013)
Director: Simon Barrett, Adam Wingard, Eduardo Sánchez, Gregg Hale, Timo Tjahjanto, Gareth Evans, Jason Eisener

Revisited this along with the original & further sequels with Emily. Mixing a variety of genre cinema, the V/H/S series were a breath of fresh air for the anthology film format; beginning with the 2012 release of the first film. Gimmicky; yes, schlocky; you betcha, entertaining; always. I think V/H/S/2 ranks at the top among the lot; it has a winning combination of horror and humour, the most entertaining stories, and some of the best looking effects. The Indonesian segment by Timo Tjahjanto & Gareth Evans, "Safe Haven", is arguably the most talked about and rightfully so, it's a wild ride and truly unforgettable. I also get a real kick out of Jason Eisener's segment, "Slumber Party Alien Abduction", the gut punch of "Tank", the dog's death is a sobering note to go out on. Other segments include a delightful assortment of pervy private investigators, sci-fi eyeballs, relentless ghosts, and a semi-sentient zombie cyclist.



Tuesday 25/10/2022
Tarantulas: The Deadly Cargo (1977)
Tarantulas: The Deadly Cargo (1977)
Director: Stuart Hagmann

A made-for-TV nature run amok feature and it's not an entirely bad entry, but unfortunately nothing to really shout about either. Coffee bean dealers smuggle more than illegals when their flight from Ecuador transports a killer crop of tarantulas to the U.S. Features a blink and you'll miss it performance from 42nd Street Cinema fave, Tom Atkins, as one of the smugglers. Slow-going, the performances are decent but I didn't find it to be too memorable, save for a few choice encounters of people vs. spiders. I feel the same about Ants: It Happened at Lakewood Manor (1977), good; but nothing too memorable.



Friday 28/10/2022
Dr. Lamb (1992)
Dr. Lamb (1992)
Director: Danny Lee Sau-Yin, Billy Tang

Based on the crimes of Hong Kong serial killer, Lam Kor-Wan, Dr. Lamb is a gruesome exercise in CAT III cinema. Half police procedural/crime drama, half splattery horror. The film looks fantastic with a ubiquitous blue tint to the picture. Simon Yam is great, assuredly all performances are enjoyable, but Yam steals the show. Nicely paced with lashings of sleaze, gore, and an interesting narrative structure; most of the film is told through flashbacks. Check it out.



Friday 28/10/2022
Massacre In Dinosaur Valley (1985)
Massacre In Dinosaur Valley (1985)
Director: Michele Massimo Tarantini

A late entry into the Italian cannibal / jungle adventure genre, starring Michael Sopkiw. Also known as Cannibal Ferox II, though having little in common with that film, the plot sees a group of fossil hunters suffering a plane crash in the Amazon, forced to survive a perilous green hell. Massacre In Dinosaur Valley has a bit of an odd tone as it doesn't continue the trend of seriousness or severity like the rest of its ilk and at times feels rather like an absurd comedy. External shots of the plane crash are mind blowing, as it just features a toy airplane crashing through some shrubs. Bravo!



Saturday 29/10/2022
Strike Commando 2 (1988)
Strike Commando 2 (1988)
Director: Bruno Mattei, Claudio Fragasso

Low-budget Italian actioner from two of the country's most infamous directors, names that would ordinarily have me rolling my eyes, wondering: "Do I really need to subject myself to this?" and "How bad could it be?". Turns out; not that bad at all.
First time checking this one out, but I had previously seen the first Strike Commando (1986), not that there's any continuity!
Starring Brent Huff as Michael Ransom (in the first Strike Commando, Ransom was played by Reb Brown) and Harry Potter's Dumbledore, Richard Harris as Major Vic Jenkins. A good film that benefits from a couple of drinks, I had some fun with this one. The stunts are great, acting is hammy, and there's moments of cringe-inducing dialogue between Huff and co-star Mary Stävin. It is everything I could have hoped for. Check it out.



Sunday 30/10/2022
V/H/S: Viral (2014)
V/H/S: Viral (2014)
Director: Marcel Sarmiento, Gregg Bishop, Nacho Vigalondo, Justin Benson, Aaron Scott Moorhead, Todd Lincoln

I mentioned the strongest and now we move-on to the weakest entry in the V/H/S franchise. There is some fun to be had here, as the individual segments themselves aren't too bad, but the film is marred by atrocious CGI / visual effects and a wraparound story that is near-complete nonsense. "Dante The Great" is a good concept of the impossibility of defending against magic, but the effects begin to deter from the storytelling. The same can be said for "Bonestorm"; I was an apathetic skater kid in my adolescence so I get the whole "whatever man" vibes, but the kids actions and attitudes to the events around them are unbelievable. "Parallel Monsters" is a morbid take on the alternate universe theme and gives a whole new meaning to "monster cocks" with dark and satanic results. Overall I find it to be the worst in the series; a poor effort that's lacking a sense of enthusiasm that the previous two films possess.